notes and bibliography

This project wouldn’t be possible without Adam Sundberg and the multitudes of people who put work into the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database.

“Shackles, Before 1860”. National Museum of African American History and Culture. Smithsonian Institute. https://www.si.edu/object/nmaahc_2008.10.4

Siegel, Michael. “The Illegal Slave Trade to the United States, 1808-1860.” 2005. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Jean Blackwell Hutson Research and Reference Division, The New York Public Library. https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/870b71b9-0ae5-b9a1-e040-e00a18062301

“Folk art model of a slave ship on stand”. National Museum of African American History and Culture. Smithsonian Institute https://www.si.edu/object/nmaahc_2013.196.1abc

Data for map received from Trans-Atlantic Database. Slavevoyages.org 

British Parliamentary Debates in 1792. Found on google books

James Penny describes the Middle Passage to Parliament, 1789. 

“Interior of the Slave Ship Vigilante”. Diagram. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Art and Artifacts Division: The New York Public Library. 

“Illustration of slaves in the cargo hold on a ship”. Engraving. Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture, Photographs and Print Division: The New York Public Library. 

Cugoano, Ottobah. Thoughts and Sentiments on the Evil of Slavery. London: s.n., 1787 (reprint, London: Dawsons of Pall Mall, 1969). From Children and Youth in History, Children in the Slave Trade, annotated by Colleen A. Vasconcellos. http://chnm.gmu.edu/cyh/items/show/141?section=primarysources&source=153

** due to the extenuating circumstance with COVID-19, I apologize that this project is not made to it’s fullest potential. **